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Fairy Tale / Folk Tale Cyber Dictionary

Visit the Dictionary

Original Lesson by Annemarie McAloon - Spring, 1999
Lesson Update Spring, 2001: Janet Barnstable and Jeannie Linss
Oak Park Elementary School District #97 - Web Producer: Janet Barnstable


Introduction | Content Areas | Standards | Implementation | Resources | Entry Skills | Evaluation | Variations | Conclusion
 

Introduction

This lesson was originally developed as part of the Illinois State Board of Education Learning Technology Center's Enternet '99 Project, coordinated by Area One Learning Technology Hub and has been further developed as part of the Illinois State Board of Education ILSI Knowledge Section, coordinated by Suburban Cook County Learning Technology Center.

Students and their teachers will become part of an international community of primary aged students who have produced content for their peers using Fairy or Folk Tales and the Internet.


 

Content Area and Grade Level

This lesson is anchored in first grade language arts and visual arts.

Curriculum Standards

STATE GOAL 1: Read with understanding and fluency.
A. Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
1.A.1a Apply word analysis skills (e.g. phonics, word patterns) to recognize new words.

1A.1b Comprehend unfamiliar words using context clues and prior knowledge; verify meanings with resource materials.

C.Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

1C.1d Summarize content of reading material using text organization (e.g., story, sequence)

STATE GOAL 26: Through creating and performing, understand how works of art are produced.

B. Apply skills and knowledge necessary to create and perform in one or more of the arts.
26B.1d Visual Arts: Demonstrate knowledge and skills to create visual works of art using manipulation, eye-hand coordination, building, and imagination.

Implementation Overview

This project is part of a fairy tale or folk tale unit. Depending upon how many activities you choose to do, it could take several periods. Three periods are required to read the book and brainstorm ideas for words and two computer periods are required to draw the picture, label the word, and type the sentence.

Process

After reading many types of stories to class, the teacher chooses a fairy tale or folk tale for student to illustrate and contacts the Web Producer of the CyberDictionary. The teacher introduces and reads the story by using one or more of these activities:

  • Dresses as a character from the story.
  • Discuss unfamiliar words or words with multi-meanings.
  • Talk about the "things" and "happenings" of the tale.
  • Students draw and write or dictate their favorite part of the story.
  • Students sequence pictures or sentences in the correct order of events in the story.

The students then:

  • Brainstorm to find a "thing", "happening", or "word" for each letter of the alphabet. (See Sample.)
  • Brainstorm and create a sentence using the word selected for each letter.
  • Illustrate one or more of the sentences.
  • Label the illustration with the correctly spelled word.
  • Type or dictate a sentence for each illustration.
  • Submit drawings, labels, and sentences to the CyberDictionary


Table of Goals/Benchmarks/Activities

English
Language Arts

Benchmarks

Activities

STATE GOAL 1: Read with understanding and fluency.

A. Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.

1.A.1a Apply word analysis skills (e.g. phonics, word patterns) to recognize new words.

Brainstorm words, for each letter in the alphabet, related to the story.

Brainstorm and create a sentence using the selected word. 

1A.1b Comprehend unfamiliar words using context clues and prior knowledge; verify meanings with resource materials.

Read tale

Discuss unfamiliar words or words with multi-meanings.

C.Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

1C.1d Summarize content of reading material using text organization (e.g., story, sequence)

Students illustrate a word from the story.

Students write or dictate a sentence from the story, that includes their word.

FINE ARTS:
Visual Arts

Benchmarks

Activities

STATE GOAL 26: Through creating and performing, understand how works of art are produced.

A. Apply skills and knowledge necessary to create and perform in one or more of the arts.

26B.1d Visual Arts: Demonstrate knowledge and skills to create visual works of art using manipulation, eye-hand coordination, building, and imagination.

Students illustrate pictures corresponding to each word, creating a "dictionary."


Resources Needed

What's needed to implement this lesson:
  • Class set of fairy talebooks
  • E-mail account for the teacher.
  • Software needed: Any painting program such as: KidPix or AppleWorks Paint. (Pictures could be hand drawn and scanned if no other technology is available.)
  • Optional: Specific reference material in the classroom or school library: Books on various types of fairy tales or versions of the same fairy tale geared for the primary level.
  • Optional: Video and/or audio materials: - Movies of fairy tales or sound tapes of fairy tales.
  • Teacher Reference Web Sites:

Human Resources:

  • At least one teacher is needed to read stories, brainstorm and record ideas and teach computer skills. Two teachers can be used if one is responsible for computer projects only. An aide is always helpful with helping children to type, draw or check to see if they are correctly following and implementing the instruction. Sometimes this can be older students in the school as illustrated in buddy mentoring.


 

Entry Level Skills and Knowledge

Students should know the beginning sounds of words and be able to label them. Example: wolf starts with a W.

The teacher needs to be comfortable with the technology or have support from others to help with the technology skills. The project requires the basic skills of opening a program and saving files to a specific location. In addition, the teacher needs to know how to save pictures as .gif or .jpg files. The teacher will also need to be comfortable with using email and know how to attach a document to an email message.


 

Evaluation

The lesson will be successful if the children remember the story and the part that they played in it as evidenced by their labeled drawing and sentence. The drawing and labeling will be recognizable to the observer or evaluator. Some students may go beyond the basic level of completion and be able to remember many of the drawings and/or sentences.

Statement of teacher/student learning from Kendra Takanishi, Kapa'a, Hawaii.

Evaluation Rubric

 

Activities

Exceeds

Meets

Striving

Not yet

Brainstorm words, for each letter in the alphabet, related to the story.

Listens with attention. Contributes to brainstorming with appropriate words for the letters. Able to help others find words with hints and/or clues.

Listens with attention. Contributes to brainstorming with appropriate words for the letter.

Listens with attention, but does not make suggestions. Can find a word with adult or peer assistance.

Unable to attend to the brainstorming.

Unable to find a word with adult or peer assistance.

Students uses computer to illustrate pictures corresponding to their word for the "dictionary" based on their hand drawn rough draft.

Drawing pertains to the story and is a clear represention of the word based on their hand drawn rough draft..

Drawing is a clear represention of the word based on their hand drawn rough draft..

Drawing is a represention of the word

Drawing does not represent word.

Students clearly label their illustration with the correctly spelled word.

Students clearly and attractively label their illustration with the correctly spelled word.

Students clearly label their illustration with the correctly spelled word.

Students label their illustration with the correctly spelled word.

Students label their illustration with the word.

Brainstorms and creates a complete sentence using the assigned letter of the alphabet.

Creates a complex sentence using the assigned letter of the alphabet.

Creates a complete sentence using the assigned letter of the alphabet.

Creates a partial or complete sentence related to the story.

Has difficulty including the word in a sentence related to the story, even with help.

 

Possible Variations

When their tale becomes part the the Cyber Dictionary, they can print out the sheets and create a "paper book". They will have a personalized printed volume to take home. Other tales from the "Dictionary" can be added. The classroom can have it's own volume of Fairy and Folk Tales written by other primary students.

This activity would also work well with repetitive stories or counting stories.

Further integration into other subjects is a natural outcome. Adaptation by Kindergarten class with further integration into curriculum by Kendra Takanishi, Kapa'a, Hawaii.

Conclusion

In conclusion, "Fairy Tale and Folk Tale Cyber Dictionary "is a worthwhile project. Since fairy tales and folk tales are a universal source of fiction, they are easily accesssible. It helps students recall objects in the story in an alphabetical context. It is a fun and very creative activity.

If you wish your students' work to be posted in the dictionary, contact Janet Barnstable


Updated: July 4, 2002 - Janet Barnstable
Major update on June, 2001 by Janet Barnstable and Jeannie Linss
Based on a template from The WebQuest Page